This evening I spent an hour or so looking at CDC death statistics in an effort to understand what’s going on. Here is the most important thing I learned:

The CDC counts “excess deaths” the same way the IRS counts gambling winnings.

If you go to the casino four weeks in a row (I don’t, in case you were wondering) and the first week you lose $500, the second week you lose $800, the third week you win $1200, and the fourth week you lose $700, you have a net loss of $800. But guess what? When you do your taxes, the $1200 has to be added to your income, but the $2000 may not be subtracted.

Likewise, when the CDC counts “excess deaths” (the number of deaths above that which is predictable from past history) for a given area, the numbers are handled on a similarly one-way street. Let’s say for a given jurisdiction for a four month period the excess death total for March is 300 over, April is 500 under, May is 600 over, and June is 800 under. In total, there were 400 fewer deaths than predicted (“excess deaths”). But like their brethren in the IRS, they ignore the two months that were under, and report 900 excess deaths for the period.  This is somehow built in to their definition of excess deaths.

There may be a good reason for why they do this, I don’t know.  Statistics can be complicated. But you can be certain that the politicians and their whores in the major media will use these numbers to continue to propagate the scam. And you can also be sure that your friends in the Covid cult will see these numbers and tell you that you don’t “follow science”, while they themselves are totally ignorant of this, or worse, knowingly use it to feed their own fear and panic, while attacking the prosperity of our entire civilization.

-Jim Mogel

Categories: CultureHealth

Jim Mogel

After decades of always being "the crazy guy in church who worries too much about culture and politics", Jim read a quote from R.J. Rushdoony in The New American magazine during a frustrated involvement in secular politics as an activist with the John Birch society. He followed the trail to the works of Rushdoony. "I was a reconstructionist without realizing it”. An avid reader and a gifted writer, he contributes regularly to the MARS website blog. Jim is an electronics engineer and lives with his wife and son in Berks County, PA.

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